General FAQs
1. How can I get answers to specific performance questions about my Nady units?

Please refer to your Owner’s Manual or the manuals on our website (you can find them linked in our product pages). Generally you will find the answers you need. It’s always best to familiarize yourself with the features, performance and operation of your unit. If you still have questions after reviewing our manuals, please contact our Customer Service Department at (510) 652-2411 and press 4

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2. Where can I purchase accessories, components and parts for my Nady product?

If you cannot get these from your Nady dealer, please contact our Customer Service Department at (510) 652-2411 and press 4

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3. How do I locate my nearest Nady dealer?

Go to the Dealer Locator page above or contact a Nady Sales Representative

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4. How can I send in my Nady gear for servicing?

Before returning Nady equipment for servicing (warranty or non-warranty), please read the instructions in your warranty card. If you’ve misplaced your card, you can access it online on our website. Please note the following procedures:

1. Before sending in your unit, contact our Customer Service Department at (510) 652-2411 press 4 and describe the problem you’re having. Often our experienced Customer Service representatives can determine what the problem is and help you correct it without requiring that it be sent back.

2. If service is needed, you’ll be given an RA (Return Authorization) number that should be printed on the outside of the package before you send it back. This is important so that your unit can be properly tracked when it arrives, ensuring the fastest possible turnaround.

3. If your unit is out of warranty, you’ll be quoted the fixed price for repairing your unit. Payment can be made via Visa or MasterCard or you can enclose a personal check, cashier’s check, or money order. Please note that if you’re sending a personal check, it will take time for it to clear the bank at our end, delaying the return of your unit. For fastest turnaround, it’s best to use one of the other payment options listed.

4. Package the unit carefully (in the original packaging, if possible), making sure to include all the units/components requiring service, as well as check or money order if required. For wireless systems, unless the problem is obviously limited to just one component (e.g., a broken transmitter ON/OFF switch), both the transmitter and receiver should be sent back, as well as the AC adapter and all cables supplied.

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5. If I send in my Nady unit for servicing, how long will it take to get it back?

General turnaround time averages around 2 weeks or less, not including shipping time back and forth. Occasionally turnaround time is longer than 2 weeks, most often due to a temporary shortage of the specific repair parts or replacement units required to complete your service job. Delays can also occur while waiting for bank clearance of payment by personal check. To help expedite quick return of your unit, be sure to clearly print your Return Authorization Number (RA #) on the outside of the package you send in to us. In general, units are serviced in the order received. If you do not receive your unit back within 5-6 weeks, or you have an urgent need for an expedited turnaround, please contact our Customer Service Department at (510) 652-2411 press 4 for a status update.

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6. How long is the warranty on my Nady product and what’s covered under the warranty?

For specifics regarding warranty coverage, please read the warranty card supplied with your product or access it online. Generally, the limited warranty for professional wireless and audio equipment is one year, and for consumer wireless/ audio gear and motorcycle products it is 90 days. Coverage is not included for normal wear and tear or physical abuse. Each product type has its own specific rules re what’s covered and what’s not, so please read the warranty card carefully if you have specific questions about coverage of your unit.

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Wireless FAQs

1. Can I use a guitar cable with my lavalier/headmic transmitter?

No. The output impedance and levels between these types of microphones and a guitar transmitter are not the same. There are also different components in the input circuitry of the transmitters to accommodate the type of input intended (including phantom power for the condenser mic elements). Only use transmitters set up for lavalier and headmic with those type microphone inputs exclusively. Instrument transmitters are different and specifically designed for guitar and bass signals.

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2. What is True Diversity?

True Diversity (a term coined by Nady in 1977) is the utilization of two independent receiver circuits in one receiver chassis, designed to virtually eliminate RF signal dropouts (null spots) caused by canceling of the transmitted signal at specific locations due to multi-path reflections. Either receiver circuit (or both), depending upon the location of the transmitter, may receive the transmitter signal from its own independent antenna, thus ensuring a usable signal at all times. Although True Diversity reception as described here offers the best performance in terms of eliminating signal dropouts, there are also a number of other types of diversity using dual antennas that are less expensive and offer performance almost as good. Generally these involve imperceptibly fast switching between the antennas to secure the best transmitted signal available. Our DigiTru Diversity ™ is an example of this type of diversity reception that is very effective. Not all such types of diversity are as effective as Nady’s. Also keep in mind: (1) Not all units labeled “True Diversity” are actually that, as some manufacturers use the term also for their version of antenna switching circuitry; and (2) Some receivers with dual antennas have no diversity capability at all. Such units are often identified as “dipole”, which is just another way of describing ordinary “rabbit ears”. These units are really no more effective in eliminating dropouts than non-diversity single-antenna receivers since they only have one single receiving antenna (the other is just a ground).

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3. Is UHF or VHF better?

Both VHF and UHF wireless mics operate within bands unused by TV channels (see also Selecting Open Frequencies below). About 10 years ago, as the available VHF spectrum became more crowded with wireless mics (especially in applications using multiple units in close proximity simultaneously), the original UHF “buzz” arose based on the premise that it would be less susceptible to interference in most locations. However more recently, UHF has also become increasingly congested due to High Definition television and other potential forms of interference, so this particular advantage over VHF is no longer as important a consideration as it once was. More importantly, there are other variables affecting performance that should be kept in mind. VHF actually outperforms UHF in several ways (less battery drain, quieter operation, etc). It’s also less expensive. UHF, on the other hand, has better propagation through metal obstructions within line-of-site, multichannel switching capability, smaller antennas, and some other advantages. The bottom line is that both VHF and UHF have advantages and disadvantages, but both will work well in most locations and if used properly for the right applications.

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4. How many VHF/UHF channels can be used together simultaneously?

Simultaneous multichannel capability varies (as with all available brands) depending on the overall sophistication of the unit and whether it’s VHF or UHF. In general, more expensive units have more sophisticated front-end receiver filtering, etc. which allows more channels to be run together simultaneously. Typical multichannel capability for Nady wireless microphones is as follows: Encore Series—up to 5 channels; UHF-4—up to 6 channels; WS-16U—up to 10 channels per band (2 bands available); UWS-1K—up to 12 channels. It’s also possible to combine use of VHF and UHF systems in a given application allowing for more simultaneous channel operation capability even with lower-cost units.

For more detailed information regarding simultaneous multi-channel operation, please contact our Customer Service Department at (510) 652-2411 press 4

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5. Will your wireless instrument systems work with all guitars and basses?

Yes, All Nady instrument systems work well with any guitar or bass that has a pickup. Some of our wireless models are designed specifically for wireless bass only—the VHF Encore 200 and the UHF U-33B. We can also provide special cables with added internal attenuation to accommodate instruments with extra-high-output active electronics.

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6. Can I use a different headset/earpiece (other than the one provided with the system) with my ALD, PEM, or EO3?

Any headset or headphone with a 3.5 mm jack will work. However it should be noted that the ALD and E03 both have monaural transmissions and the PEM 500 is stereo. Note: You will not get stereo transmission by using stereo headphones with the ALD or E03.

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7. What are the main differences between the IR Series and the ALD?

The ALD (Assistive Listening Device) uses radio frequency (RF) to transmit its signal.
The IR Series uses infrared transmission. RF can transmit through walls and IR cannot, Therefore for installations requiring discretion, privacy, or otherwise interference-free transmission (e.g., government, military, school applications), IR is generally more appropriate. The ALD has a somewhat easier set-up and greater range performance and is ideal for churches, theaters and conference rooms where eliminating leakage into other areas is not as critical.

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8. What do the channel labels on wireless mic systems represent?

The channel labeling is a unique Nady identifier for the specific FCC-approved operating frequency of that unit as listed in megahertz (MHz). This labeling also helps you to avoid frequency interference situations caused by channels overlapping or being too close together in frequency.

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9. I’m not sure if my wireless is working properly. What can I do to check?

It’s best to start with your Owner’s Manual and our Troubleshooting Guide. If you still have questions or concerns after reading these, please call our Customer Service Department at (510) 652-2411 press 4

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10. What is interference and how does it affect my wireless system?

Interference can be anything that interrupts your wireless transmission, causing unwanted noises and reducing the acceptable reception range. The source of interference can be electrical (AC line noise), physical (poor reception due to obstructions) or another transmission on the same or close frequency. In many instances, relocating your receiver or adjusting your mute can clear up the interference.

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11. What is frequency agility?

Most of our UHF wireless systems allow users to select and change the operating frequency when frequency conflicts are encountered. We offer several models/options, ranging from 16 channels (WS-16U) to 1000 selectable channels (UWS-1K, U-1000/2000). In evaluating the number of selectable channels for such systems, and comparing with competing brands, its important to note that the width of the selectable band is more critical than the actual number of available channels within that band since band width determines the number of usable frequencies available. Width information can be found in the units listed specifications and represents the spread between the lowest possible selectable frequency to the highest.

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12. Since both VHF and UHF wireless mics systems operate on channels not used by TV, how do I know which frequency to select to make sure that I will not get interference from TV channels in my area?

Typically larger urban areas will have the most TV stations that can potentially interfere with your wireless if it is not on an unused TV channel frequency. For VHF wireless systems, please note that larger urban areas generally have channels 7, 9, 11, and 13, which can interfere with wireless on those frequencies. UHF wireless systems are generally also in the UHF TV spectrum. With the advent of DTV, additional parts of the spectrum will be taken up as these stations come online. In choosing frequencies, you need to be careful to try to avoid both existing and future TV channels.

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13. How can I service my old workhorse Nady 201XL or other older discontinued Nady wireless?

Nady policy is to service discontinued wireless systems at least three years after the model is discontinued. Units are sometimes serviced longer than 3 years if parts are still available. As a courtesy to our longtime customers, we can often offer trade-in upgrades to an equivalent current model at special pricing, generally for no more than the repair/replacement cost if we were able to fix the original units. For further information regarding a specific discontinued model requiring repair, please contact our Customer Service Department at (520) 652-2411 press 4

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Pro Audio FAQs

1. How do I determine what power amplifier I should use with my Nady speaker?

Divide the peak power rating (watts) of the speaker in half, which will give you the root-means-square (RMS) rating. Also note the speakers listed Ohm load rating. The specs for your power amp list the RMS output power (in watts) for different speaker loads (8 Ohm, 4 Ohm, sometimes 2 Ohm). The general rule in selecting which amp to use with your speaker is to make sure that the amps RMS power rating at your speaker’s Ohm rating doesn’t exceed the RMS power rating of the speaker. This will ensure that you don’t blow the speaker with signals that exceed its rating. Higher power amps can also be used, but extra care must be taken to prevent loud signals that can damage your speakers. Such damage caused by overpowering your speakers is not covered by the speakers warranty.

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2. I’m not getting any audio from my studio condenser mic...what should I do?

Studio condenser mics require powering of the internal electronics to output a signal. Some condenser mics require internal batteries and others draw their power directly from the mixing console or our optional SMPS-1 phantom power supply. Be sure to read your Manual to ensure use of the correct power source for your mic. Tube Condensers require use of the power supply provided, and must have the selectable AC voltage switch to be set to that of your AC source (115 or 230 VAC).

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3. What is phantom power and does my mic require it?

Phantom Power is a method of supplying power to a condenser microphone (without internal batteries) through the microphone cable itself. It is DC voltage (usually 12-48 volts) and is provided by either the mixer itself or external power supplies connected between the condenser mic and the mixer. (See also differences between dynamic and condenser mics, below).

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4. What are polar patterns?


Polar patterns are the way a microphone picks up sound. Common patterns are omnidirectional (which picks up sound equally from all directions), and unidirectional, which includes cardioid, super-cardioid and hyper-cardioid, as well as figure-8 (bi-directional). The spec sheets for these mics display the sound pick-up pattern for each of them as a 360° plot.

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5. What is the difference between dynamic and condenser mics?

A dynamic microphone transmits sound by the use of a voice coil/magnet assembly. Condenser microphones feature an electrically-charged diaphragm design and some built-in electronics that require powering, either from internal batteries or external phantom powering through the cable. Generally condenser mics provide a louder output for the same signal and have more high-end transient detail than dynamic mics, which often have a mid-range peak that adds presence and punch to vocals and many instruments. Both types of microphones are commonly recommended for many overlapping miking applications. The type selected is usually based on subjective decisions from experimentation or prior experience.

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6. What’s the difference between an active and passive speaker?

An active speaker has its own built-in power amplifier and mic/line input jacks and controls. A passive speaker needs an external amplifier to produce audio.

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7. How do I know which Nady ribbon microphone to choose for my application?

The Nady RSM Series is extremely versatile, and all models are appropriate for most recording and even some live sound applications. There are variations in tone between the RSM Series ribbon mics that can be heard upon careful A/B listening. Ultimately the decision as to which mic to use for a particular application is a purely subjective one depending on the exact sound you’re after. However, we recommend using either the RSM-4 or RSM-5 when recording amp cabinets since their respective shapes and tonal characteristics make them ideal for this application.

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